Tag: race for women (page 1 of 1)

The journey to affirm women’s rights of famous women in sports (Part 2)

In this part, let’s continue the list of sports women that have stood up to fight for women rights!

HAJRA KHAN, PAKISTAN

This female athlete made history in the National Women’s Football Tournament in Pakistan and the Maldives Women’s Association in 2014.

Not only is a professional athlete, Hajra also aspires to be passed on the tops His passionate fire for same-sex friends at home. For her, opening a regular academy specializing in soccer is the dream and ambition that she is cherishing day by day.

Like many other female athletes, Hajra expects the media to have a more objective view of women participating in sports, as well as allowing them to shine with their passion. She also looks forward to the change in the stereotypes of people around the world about sport, where not only men but even women can become future champions.

ADRIELLE ALEXANDRE, BRAZIL

For just 12-year-old Adrielle, who was tasked with keeping the Olympic torch in Rio in 2016, the victory is not just about being an aerobics at the Olympics, but more important. is getting respect from everyone.

She is also a member of One Win Leads to Another, a program organized by the Women’s Union in collaboration with the Brazilian Olympic Committee to encourage the young generation of athletes to boldly pursue their dreams as well as the dots end violence against women, toward a better future. Although still quite young, but Adrielle is well aware of her future direction and always makes every effort for her passion.

ABBY WAMBACH, USA

Female athlete Abby Wambach has won the Olympic gold medal twice, and holds the women’s world championship at the World Football Federation (FIFA). Not only is she a top international female goalscorer, but she is also using her influence to speak up for equal rights for workers around the world.

There will be a Formula race for women only

A new motorsport race of Formula 3 – F3 for women has just been launched and will officially launch in the middle of next year, aiming to help female riders soon reach the prestigious Formula 1 race – F1 in the future.

The new W Series will mainly use the 1.8 liter Tatuus F3 race car and will start in May 1919, free for about 18 to 20 female riders to register for the competition. Drivers will have to undergo thorough testing, qualification and training before officially entering the competition.

The total prize value will be up to $1.5 million, of which the champion will receive $500,000 and the corresponding prize money will be spread evenly until the driver ranked 18th overall. According to the organizers, there will be about six 30-minute races each of the top races in Europe, most of which have ever held F1 races. In addition, the organizers also plan to expand the tournament scale to the Americas, Asia and Australia in the future.

The W Series will receive support from Technical Director Adrian Newey of the renowned Red Bull Racing team in a coaching role, with mentor from former F1 driver David Coulthard.

The F3 is often seen as the beginning of a motorsport career for young riders, before going on to compete at the higher levels of F2 and finally the prestigious F1 race. No female racers have been in an F1 tournament since 1976, but with the launch of the W Series, the organizers expect to provide a platform for female riders to develop their skills, before participating. compete on an equal footing with men at the higher levels of this world’s most exciting speed sport.

The W Series will still be a story of the future, but for now, can look at some of the promising faces of the world women’s racing village, including the 25-year-old Colombian rider, Tatiana Calderon, currently is the only female driver of the Swiss F1 Sauber racing team and has participated in the Grand Prix for the past two years.